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The Texas Supreme Court on Friday sided with asylum-seeking mothers in a ruling that states the mothers have standing in a detention facility lawsuit, sending the case back to the appellate court.

HOUSTON — The Texas Supreme Court on Friday sided with asylum-seeking mothers in a ruling that states the mothers have standing in a detention facility lawsuit, sending the case back to the appellate court.

The case dates to 2015, when the Texas Department of Family Protective Services issued a rule that provided detention facilities an exemption to state child care licensing standards that largely prohibit facilities from housing unrelated adults and children in the same bedroom.

Grassroots Leadership, a nonprofit that works to abolish for-profit private prisons and detention centers, is the plaintiff in the case along with four asylum-seeking mothers and a day care center. The plaintiffs allege that the rule is resulting in safety risks and privacy violations of the detainees and their children because the children are housed in rooms with adults they are not related to.

As the case played out in courts, the department was prohibited from granting licenses under the rule, but an appellate court reversed the injunction stating that the mothers could not trace injury to the rule and therefore had no standing. The appellate court also denied reconsideration of the case.

The Texas Supreme Court reversed that ruling Friday, stating that detainee mothers did have standing, and justices directed the lower court of appeals to consider the remaining jurisdictional issues and the merits of the case, as appropriate.

“The court held that the detained mothers had standing to challenge the rule because they alleged concrete injuries, including probable risk of harm and privacy violations,” the ruling read. “Contrary to the court of appeals’ interpretation, Rule 748.7 permits minors to share bedrooms with unrelated adults where it otherwise would not be permitted at these facilities, and thus the injuries alleged are traceable to the rule. Should they be proven, the requested relief seeks redress of those harms.”

Grassroots Leadership and DFPS could not immediately be reached for comment on the ruling.

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