Athens Review, Athens, Texas

February 18, 2014

Watershed public meeting set for Chandler Feb. 24

Special to the Review
The Athens Review

Athens — The Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board and the Texas Institute for Applied Environmental Research invite residents in the Kickapoo Creek in Henderson County and Neches River Above Lake Palestine watersheds to a public meeting to discuss a water quality project.

The meeting will be held on Monday, Feb. 24 at Chandler City Hall, located at 811 State Highway 31 East in Chandler. Sign-in will begin at 5:45 p.m., and the meeting will start at 6 p.m.

Kickapoo Creek in Henderson County extends from the confluence with Lake Palestine east of Brownsboro in Henderson County to the confluence of Slater Creek.  

The Neches River Above Lake Palestine extends from the confluence of Prairie Creek upstream to the Rhines Lake Dam.  Kickapoo Creek in Henderson County and the Neches River Above Lake Palestine are on the state’s list of impaired waters for having bacteria levels that exceed water quality standards for primary contact recreation.

At this meeting, landowners and citizens will have the opportunity to learn about a new project, Recreational Use Attainability Analysis for Ten Creeks in the Red River and Neches River Basins, which focuses on assessing the level of recreational use occurring in Kickapoo Creek in Henderson County and the Neches River Above Lake Palestine.

Since decisions made about these waterbodies will affect landowners, citizens, industries  and municipalities, local participation is fundamental to the success of this project. Stakeholders will be asked to provide guidance on the direction of this project

Leah Taylor, with the Texas Institute for Applied Environmental Research, will give background information on Kickapoo Creek in Henderson County and the Neches River Above Lake Palestine and introduce the recreational use attainability analysis project.

“Stakeholder input on survey sites and recreational use is crucial to the success of the project,” Taylor said.

This project is funded by the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board through a general revenue nonpoint source grant to the Texas Institute for Applied Environmental Research.

For more information about the meeting, visit the project website at http://tiaer.tarleton.edu/ruaa/index.html or contact Taylor at 254-968-0513 or ltaylor@tiaer.tarleton.edu

The Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board administers Texas’ soil and water conservation law, and delivers coordinated natural resource conservation programs through the state’s 216 soil and water conservation districts.

The Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board is the lead agency for planning, implementing, and managing programs for preventing and abating agricultural and silvicultural nonpoint sources of water pollution.

The agency also: administers a water supply enhancement program through the targeted control of water-depleting brush; works to ensure the State’s network of 2,000 flood control dams are protecting lives and property by providing operation, maintenance, and structural repair grants to local government sponsors; and facilitates the Texas Invasive Species Coordinating Committee.